Optics for the Cloud - a new public lecture series


The Optics for the Cloud series features leading edge researchers giving public talks on cutting-edge topics. This time: Prof John Marsh - Photons in the Cloud: Communicating and storing data.

Dates Thursday, June 13, 2019 - Download as vCalendar
Event Times: 16:00 to 17:30
Venue Microsoft Research, 21 Station Road, Cambridge CB1 2FB
Website Event website

Event details:

Photons underpin our lives, from our ability to see through to our communication systems. While computers are built around electronics, long-haul communications are built around light. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) are the optoelectronic equivalent of the silicon chips that have revolutionised society over the last 70 years. PIC devices such as lasers, modulators, waveguides and detectors are widely used in communications, sensing, healthcare and quantum technology. Optical communications represents almost 60% of this market, with PICs currently deployed mainly in the long-haul network. However, because of society’s ever-increasing demands for data, they are migrating rapidly into the office and home.

Photons underpin our lives, from our ability to see through to our communication systems. While computers are built around electronics, long-haul communications are built around light. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) are the optoelectronic equivalent of the silicon chips that have revolutionised society over the last 70 years. PIC devices such as lasers, modulators, waveguides and detectors are widely used in communications, sensing, healthcare and quantum technology. Optical communications represents almost 60% of this market, with PICs currently deployed mainly in the long-haul network. However, because of society’s ever-increasing demands for data, they are migrating rapidly into the office and home.

 

John Marsh studied Engineering and Electrical Sciences at Cambridge before pursuing a PhD in compound semiconductors at the University of Sheffield. He moved to the School
of Engineering at Glasgow in 1986 where he was appointed Professor in 1996. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, Royal Society of Edinburgh and IEEE.

Please visit aka.ms/OpticsForTheCloud to secure your place

 

At Microsoft Research in Cambridge, we truly aspire to transform the world through deep research. The bold and inquisitive minds of our researchers and engineers have produced, and continue to produce, significant contributions to Microsoft’s most successful products and services, as well as to the broader research community. The interdisciplinary nature of our lab ensures that we push the boundaries of computing in an inclusive way, resulting in robust and trusted technologies that can be deployed at scale. We have only scratched the surface of what technology can do for us, and I am tremendously excited to be working in a team that is so committed to having a significant impact upon our society.