VISUALIZING ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION TOOLS


The world of electromagnetics can be described with Maxwell’s four equations. These equations form a language which scientist and engineers use to predict and investigate this phenomenon. This language is often taught through exercises with pen and paper, making it challenging to interpret and conceptualize the physical fields.  To demystify the simulation process, this talk will present a brief overview of how we use the equations to create our numerical simulations, as well as a demonstration of the COMSOL Multiphysics® software.

Dates Thursday, December 5, 2019 - Download as vCalendar
Event Times: 18:30
Venue Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ
Contact Name David Blake
Email cambsec@gmx.com
Website Event website

Event details:

The world of electromagnetics can be described with Maxwell’s four equations. These equations form a language which scientist and engineers use to predict and investigate this phenomenon. This language is often taught through exercises with pen and paper, making it challenging to interpret and conceptualize the physical fields.
 
However, when this same mathematical language is included in numerical simulation tools, we can visualize the electromagnetic fields. This allow scientists and engineers not only to see the physical interactions between devices, but also to optimize their designs. This could be the design of a 5G antenna or the torque from an electric motor. 

All welcome.  To make a booking please go to https://localevents.theiet.org/0744da

This talk will be given by Dr Richard Chippendale who is a Technical Manager at COMSOL UK specialising in electromagnetic simulation.  He graduated from the University of Southampton in 2009 with a Masters degree in Physics and continued in the same institution to complete a PhD investigating the interaction of lightning strikes with carbon fibre composites using numerical simulation.  He then spent 4 years as a research fellow at the University of Southampton focusing on high voltage cable simulations for both the onshore and offshore sector before joining COMSOL.
 

The Institution of Engineering and Technology represents the public, professional and educational interests of over 150,000 electrical, electronic, manufacturing and systems engineers world-wide.